Upcoming Events

Oct
27
Fri
Introduction to Identification and Ecology of San Francisco Estuary Tidal Marsh Plants @ Bay Conference Center, RTC/SFSU
Oct 27 @ 8:30 am – 5:00 pm

This introduction to the botany of San Francisco Bay tidal marshes provides basic skills for recognition and identification of the majority of plant genera and species in the San Francisco Estuary’s tidal brackish and salt marshes, and their terrestrial transition zones (ecotones), as well as a primer on the basic ecology of many species. The workshop does not presume technical knowledge of plant morphology and terminology needed to work taxonomic keys, but emphasizes visual understanding of diagnostic traits specific to tidal marsh plant genera, using photographs of plants growing in variable environments, as well as some live specimens. The species covered will include both native and non-native tidal marsh plants, and many selected uncommon to rare plants. Basic ecology reviewed will include geomorphic settings, environmental tolerances, plant associations and interactions, reproduction, dispersal, establishment, and growth. The workshop is aimed at resource managers, regulatory agency staff, naturalists, amateur botanists, and students and whose expertise is either outside classical botany, or who know tidal marsh plants primarily from other regions.

Instructor:  Peter Baye, PhD

Peter Baye has investigated coastal wetlands, beaches, and dunes since 1975, and has worked on conservation of San Francisco Bay wetlands since 1991, after receiving his Ph.D. in Plant Sciences from the University of Western Ontario, Canada. He worked on regulatory wetland restoration projects at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and endangered species planning and regulation at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, from 1991 to 2002. He was an active participant in the San Francisco Bay Wetlands Ecosystem Goals Project, and prepared the administrative draft of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s tidal marsh recovery plan. He is currently an independent consulting plant ecologist, specializing in endangered species recovery, wetland restoration, invasive plant management, and native vegetation management.

 

Nov
2
Thu
Wetland Restoration in the San Francisco Bay Area @ Bay Conference Center, RTC/SFSU
Nov 2 @ 8:30 am – Nov 3 @ 5:00 pm

This 2-day training focuses on understanding and addressing new challenges of adapting ecological restoration designs for San Francisco Estuary tidal marshes, including essential terrestrial transition zones (ecotones), to meet challenges of accelerated sea level rise and climate change. Since BEHGU (Baylands Ecosystem Habitat Goals Project science update – 2015) reassessed regional wetland restoration goals at a programmatic level, this course focuses on the dynamic bay-edge and landward-edge transition zones (ecotones) of tidal marshes that must rapidly respond to landward migration of intensified shoreline (littoral) processes. We review plants (and plant functional groups) and different sediment types as agents and tools for sea level rise adaptation of tidal marshes. We also review constraints of some past tidal marsh restoration conventions in an era of accelerated climate change. Lecture and field trips will cover principles, practices, and retrospective review covering about 40 years of San Francisco Estuary tidal marsh restoration project outcomes, including responses to major storm events, droughts, and wet years. It will feature relatively new tidal marsh edge restoration designs including wet and dry versions of “horizontal levees”, bay beaches and bay-margin marsh berms. Practical project implementation experience, as well as ecological design principles, inform the lectures and field trips.

Instructors: Peter Baye, PhD Coastal Ecologist and Botanist and Donna Ball, MS Habitat Restoration Director, Save SF Bay

Peter Baye has investigated coastal wetlands, beaches, and dunes since 1975, and has worked on conservation of San Francisco Bay wetlands since 1991, after receiving his Ph.D. in Plant Sciences from the University of Western Ontario, Canada. He worked on regulatory wetland restoration projects at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and endangered species planning and regulation at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, from 1991 to 2002. He was an active participant in the San Francisco Bay Wetlands Ecosystem Goals Project, and prepared the administrative draft of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s tidal marsh recovery plan. He is currently an independent consulting plant ecologist, specializing in endangered species recovery, wetland restoration, invasive plant management, and native vegetation management.

Donna brings over 10 years experience as a salt marsh ecologist on the West Coast to Save The Bay, where she currently guides the Habitat Restoration Team in providing on-the-ground community-based habitat restoration programs utilizing over 5,000 volunteers annually. Previously, Donna worked at H. T. Harvey & Associates as a senior restoration ecologist working on a variety of large and small-scale tidal restoration projects throughout San Francisco Bay. She holds a M.S. in Environmental Science from Western Washington University, with a focus on Marine and Estuarine Ecosystems.

 

Classroom as well as field site visits

 

Nov
7
Tue
Environmental Negotiation Training @ Bay Conference Center, Romberg Tiburon Center
Nov 7 @ 8:30 am – Nov 9 @ 5:00 pm

The Elkhorn Slough NERR Coastal Training Program and the SF Bay Wetland Science and Coastal Training Program are excited to announce the joint offering of this popular training.

Workshop Objectives

This workshop applies principled negotiation concepts (e.g., Fisher and Ury’s “Getting to Yes” series) to specific environmental issue applications. Negotiation simulations, role-playing, and experiential exercises are used to provide a fun and safe way to reinforce negotiation principles. Effective negotiation requires effective communication and trust building. This course emphasizes using interest-based negotiation approaches to build trust, persuade, and create lasting solutions. The skills taught in this class help many reduce anxiety about negotiations while helping to achieve successful outcomes.

Intended Audience
This workshop will provide useful tools to the following groups:

  • Planners
  • Agency representatives
  • Scientists
  • Land managers
  • Supervisors and program managers
  • Environmental Groups
  • Citizen participants in public processes

Space is limited for this popular workshop!

Registration deadline is 10/17 to meet enrollment requirement.

Training leader: Jim Nelson

Jim Nelson currently is the owner of Nelson Facilitation LLC and an expert in facilitation and negotiation. He held several responsible positions with the California Department of Fish and Game (DFG) until he retired at the end of 2006. While with DFG he represented the state on numerous complex private and public projects. Jim successfully negotiated environmental benefits on behalf of the people of California. He worked on the review of projects under the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). He is an expert on biological impact assessment, mitigation design and implementation, and monitoring in a CEQA context. He has authored technical articles on conducting biological studies and has written protocols that have been used by many state and federal agencies.